Nice The Pick Up Artist photos

A few nice the pick up artist images I found:

Perkins Cove, Maine
the pick up artist

Image by UGArdener
One Sunday afternoon in August we landed at Boston’s Logan Airport, picked up our rental car, and in 90 minutes we were in Perkins Cove enjoying a perfect Lobster Roll on a bench overlooking sailboats, fluffy blue skies and the famous Marginal Way, a one-mile walkway that runs along the rocky coast to Ogunquit. The SLIDESHOW of the set follows us around these two towns that afternoon and the next morning.

From Wikipedia:

"Ogunquit, which means "beautiful place by the sea" in the indigenous Abenaki language, was first a village within Wells, which was settled in 1641. The first sawmill here was established in 1686, and shipbuilding developed along the tidal Ogunquit River. Local shipwrights built schooners, brigs and dories.

At what was then called Fish Cove, near the unnavigable Josias River, fishing was a major livelihood. But the cove was unprotected by a headland or breakwater from Atlantic storms, so fishermen had to protect their boats by hauling them ashore each night. Resolving to create a safe anchorage, they formed the Fish Cove Harbor Association, and dug a channel across land they purchased to connect Fish Cove with the Josias River. When the trench was complete, erosion helped to further widen the passage. The resulting tidewater basin is called Perkins Cove, spanned by a manually operated draw footbridge. With a 3½-mile beach of pale sand and dunes forming a barrier peninsula, connected to the mainland in 1888 by bridge across the Ogunquit River, the village was discovered by artists. It became a popular art colony and tourist area. Particularly after 1898, when the Ogunquit Art Colony was established, it was not unusual to see both artists and fishermen working around Perkins Cove. To accommodate summer crowds, several seaside hotels and inns were built. Marginal Way, a scenic trail, runs along the coast from Perkins Cove to Ogunquit Beach."

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ogunquit,_Maine

Perkins Cove, Maine
the pick up artist

Image by UGArdener
One Sunday afternoon in August we landed at Boston’s Logan Airport, picked up our rental car, and in 90 minutes we were in Perkins Cove enjoying a perfect Lobster Roll on a bench overlooking sailboats, fluffy blue skies and the famous Marginal Way, a one-mile walkway that runs along the rocky coast to Ogunquit. The SLIDESHOW of the set follows us around these two towns that afternoon and the next morning.

From Wikipedia:

"Ogunquit, which means "beautiful place by the sea" in the indigenous Abenaki language, was first a village within Wells, which was settled in 1641. The first sawmill here was established in 1686, and shipbuilding developed along the tidal Ogunquit River. Local shipwrights built schooners, brigs and dories.

At what was then called Fish Cove, near the unnavigable Josias River, fishing was a major livelihood. But the cove was unprotected by a headland or breakwater from Atlantic storms, so fishermen had to protect their boats by hauling them ashore each night. Resolving to create a safe anchorage, they formed the Fish Cove Harbor Association, and dug a channel across land they purchased to connect Fish Cove with the Josias River. When the trench was complete, erosion helped to further widen the passage. The resulting tidewater basin is called Perkins Cove, spanned by a manually operated draw footbridge. With a 3½-mile beach of pale sand and dunes forming a barrier peninsula, connected to the mainland in 1888 by bridge across the Ogunquit River, the village was discovered by artists. It became a popular art colony and tourist area. Particularly after 1898, when the Ogunquit Art Colony was established, it was not unusual to see both artists and fishermen working around Perkins Cove. To accommodate summer crowds, several seaside hotels and inns were built. Marginal Way, a scenic trail, runs along the coast from Perkins Cove to Ogunquit Beach."

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ogunquit,_Maine

August Afternoon along the Marginal Way – Oginquit to Perkins Cove, Maine
the pick up artist

Image by UGArdener
One Sunday afternoon in August we landed at Boston’s Logan Airport, picked up our rental car, and in 90 minutes we were in Perkins Cove enjoying a perfect Lobster Roll on a bench overlooking sailboats, fluffy blue skies and the famous Marginal Way, a one-mile walkway that runs along the rocky coast to Ogunquit. The SLIDESHOW of the set follows us around these two towns that afternoon and the next morning.

From Wikipedia:

"Ogunquit, which means "beautiful place by the sea" in the indigenous Abenaki language, was first a village within Wells, which was settled in 1641. The first sawmill here was established in 1686, and shipbuilding developed along the tidal Ogunquit River. Local shipwrights built schooners, brigs and dories.

At what was then called Fish Cove, near the unnavigable Josias River, fishing was a major livelihood. But the cove was unprotected by a headland or breakwater from Atlantic storms, so fishermen had to protect their boats by hauling them ashore each night. Resolving to create a safe anchorage, they formed the Fish Cove Harbor Association, and dug a channel across land they purchased to connect Fish Cove with the Josias River. When the trench was complete, erosion helped to further widen the passage. The resulting tidewater basin is called Perkins Cove, spanned by a manually operated draw footbridge. With a 3½-mile beach of pale sand and dunes forming a barrier peninsula, connected to the mainland in 1888 by bridge across the Ogunquit River, the village was discovered by artists. It became a popular art colony and tourist area. Particularly after 1898, when the Ogunquit Art Colony was established, it was not unusual to see both artists and fishermen working around Perkins Cove. To accommodate summer crowds, several seaside hotels and inns were built. Marginal Way, a scenic trail, runs along the coast from Perkins Cove to Ogunquit Beach."

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ogunquit,_Maine

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